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Historical front pages from The Parkersburg News and Sentinel

Front Page News
Newspapers provide a valuable record of the events that shape our lives. Years later they are virtual time machines into how events were perceived as they occurred.

The Marietta Times has also been publishing since the 1800s. View news from Ohio by visiting the Historical Front Page section for The Marietta Times

Below are many of the front pages that helped to shape the lives of Parkersburg residents. The pages range from the second edition of The Parkersburg Sentinel in 1875 through the very first edition of The Parkersburg News and Sentinel formed when The Parkersburg News and The Parkersburg Sentinel merged printing on Aug. 25, 2009. All pages have a link to a pdf copy of the page. The pdf will open in a new window and allow you to read stories that are on the page.
1890- 1949 | 1950- 1989 | 1990 - present

1890s

Date: July 24, 1875
Early Sentinel

Vol. 1, Issue 2 of the Parkersburg Sentinel

 

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Date: Sept. 24, 1898

Early News


Vol. II, Issue 76 of the Daily News
Newspapers by now have gotten a little more graphical. This paper had a story about a "unique character" dying in the oil fields as wll as a little bit of baseball news in the lower right corner.

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1900s

Date: March 19, 1909
Flood

Quincy water tank floods part of Parkersburg

 

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Date: March 20, 1909
Flood

Quincy water tank floods part of Parkersburg

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1910

Date: March 28, 1913

1913 Flood

"Ohio Experiencing Worst Flood in State's History"


One of the worst floods to ever strike the region cause massive loss of life and property.

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Date: April 13, 1913

1913 Flood

"Words Can Hardly Describe Conditions at Marietta, Many People Lost Homes and Business Paralyzed "


One of the worst floods to ever strike the region cause massive loss of life and property.

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Date: June 29, 1914
WWI
“Martial Law Proclaimed in Sarajevo Where Heir to Throne Was Assassinated”
The start of World War I began when the nephew of Emperor Franz Josef and heir to the Austrian-Hungarian throne, Archduke Francis Ferdinand,
and his consort, the Duchess of Hubenberg, were assassinated in Bosnia. On April 6, 1917, the United States would declare war on Germany.

Also on the page are several local deaths and a different sort of one - The Blennerhassett Hotel was to close due to the saloons closing under Prohibition.

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1910

Date: May 7-11, 1915
Lusitania

“1502 Lives Are Lost - 137 Americans Among the Lost on Lusitania”


A steamship traveling from New York to Liverpool was sunk by a German torpedo, with a number of Americans aboard, and by April 6, 1917, the United States and Germany were at war.

The May 8 page is consumed by the Lusitania attack. No local people were present on the ship, but several from West Virginia were traveling aboard.

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Date: May 8, 1915

Lusitania

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Date: May 12, 1915

Lusitania

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Date: May 13, 1915

Lusitania

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1920

Date: May 19, 1927

Bath School disaster:

Bombing in Michigan resulted in the 45 deaths, most of them children when a man dynamited the Bath Consolidated School. The deaths constitute the deadliest act of mass murder in a school in U.S. history.

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Date: May 21, 1927

Lindbergh

“Lindbergh Completes Paris Flight”

Captain Charles A. Lindbergh was honored for his historic flight in crossing the Atlantic Ocean, from New York to Paris non-stop, at the ages of 25. President Coolidge was among the well-wishers and
Lindbergh was greeted with much ceremony in Paris. Later, tragedy struck the famous pilot when his young son was kidnapped and murdered.

This tragedy brought about the law to make kidnapping illegal and Lindbergh went on to fly in combat missions in World War II as a civilian.

The May 22 page is filled with excitement over Lindbergh’s historic flight, with the citizens of Wheeling sending a cablegram to Lindbergh
stating, “Every citizen of West Virginia who is interested in aviation, and that means every one, extends to you their congratulations for your splendid achievement.”

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Date:
May 25, 1927

Lindbergh


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a .pdf of this page

1930

Date: March 5, 1933
FDR
“Roosevelt To Tackle Bank Emergency - Woodin Calls Meeting For This
Morning”


Franklin D. Roosevelt took office on a Saturday and by Sunday morning was all ready down to business. With his cabinet choices confirmed, Roosevelt was calling for a Congress session to address emergency legislation to combat the banking emergency the nation was suffering.

The New Deal went on to provide relief for the nation crippled under the Great Depression, and Roosevelt was subsequently elected for four terms of office.

Also on the page, inaugurated West Virginia governor Herman Guy Kump proposed a general sales tax to raise $15,000,000 annually.

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Date: January 19, 1937

The flood of 1937

“River Rise to Stop At 39 Ft.”
“Expect New Stage 42-Ft Sat.”
“Expect 48-Ft Here”
“Predict 51-Ft.; 48 At 3 P.M.”

Predicting flood levels in Parkersburg can be extremely difficult, as shown by these headlines. The worst flood in Parkersburg history was 1913. Early in 1937 after 14 days of rain, meteorologists were forced to raise crest predictions over and over again, as the Ohio Valley was hit with floods.

As shown on the January 23 page, not only was Parkersburg affected, but Wheeling, Pittsburgh, Louisville, Cincinnati, Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois were all subject to terrible floods, leaving many people homeless. Following this, Parkersburg decided to build a floodwall. Learn about the flood wall.

Construction began in 1946 and was finished in 1950.

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Date: January 21, 1937

The flood of 1937

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Date: January 22, 1937

The flood of 1937

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Date: January 23, 1937

The flood of 1937

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Date: January 24, 1937

The flood of 1937

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Date: January 29, 1937

The flood of 1937

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1940

Date: December 9, 1941
Attack on Pearl Harbor

“Jap Planes Approach West Coast - Japanese Troops Have Landed Near Manila - Jap Warplanes Blast Manila, U.S. Military Camps”

With at least 350 U.S. casualties reported, the U.S. was rocked by reports of bombs at military camps and bases. The attack on Pearl Harbor had just occurred days before on December 7. The attack on
Pearl Harbor was the last straw and finally led to the United States to join in World War II.

Also on the page, a report of hostile planes being driven off at San Francisco near Golden Gate. San Francisco was partially blacked out for three hours for air raid protection.

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Date: June 7-15, 1944
D-Day

“Reinforcements Pour Into France - Bad Weather Hampers Allied Air Arm”

As the Allies, including the United States, stormed Normandy Beach, in one of the biggest coordinated attacks of all time, the aftermath left more than 10,000 dead, wounded or captured. This historic effort led to the beginning of the end of World War II. In the subsequent days, headlines show allies fought in Italy, Japanese ships were sunk and
the German line was broken as more and more ground was taken by the Allied Forces. By June 15, B-29 superforces had bombed Japan, German
resistance was cracked in Italy and Nazi communication and supply routes were broken.

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Date: June 8, 1944

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Date: June 9, 1944

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Date: June 10, 1944

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Date: June 12, 1944

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Date: Aug. 14, 1945

The end of WWII is near
"Truman gets no Jap Reply, War goes no while enemy stalls"


The U.S. awaits word on the actual end of World War II.

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Date: August 15, 1945
End of WWII

“Allies Officially Accept Japanese Surrender, Armed Forces Get Order
to Cease Firing, MacArthur Will Receive Japs’ Capitulation, Truman
Proclaims 2-Day National Holiday”

In an extremely rare 4-deck headline, the surrender of Japan and the end of World War II is celebrated. As President Truman acts to demobilize the military war machine and allied forces are ordered to cease fire, across the United States celebrations break out and August 15 and 16 are declared national holidays. Locally, the people of Parkersburg mark the end of the war with a sounding of sirens and a peace parade.

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Date: August 16, 1945
End of WWII

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Date: August 18, 1945
DuPont

 

“800-Acre Washington Bottom Site Selected for Huge DuPont Plant”


“Ferro-Alloy Plant To Be Constructed Above Belpre”

In the post-war economy, our area sees the building of two major plants for our area, DuPont and Union Carbide. As peace conferences are announced and Cold War heat is determining the size of U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Belpre and Washington Bottom gear up for the preparation of these major businesses. We see these businesses yet today.

 

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Date: August 30, 1948
Union Carbide

 

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Date: Oct. 2, 1949

The news of a formation of a a new "Chinese peoples republic" was reported in a very short story that could be found at the bottom of the front page.

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